Quickly get IP addresses of new VMs

I spin up a lot of VMs using VMware Fusion. I generally keep “clean” generic copies of a few different distros and versions of Linux servers ready to go with my login, an sshd server, ssh keys, and basic settings that I use already set up. When I need to quickly test something manually — usually some new, multi-VM distributed container orchestration or database system — I just make as many copies of the server’s *.vmwarevm file as I need, fire up the VM copies on my laptop, test whatever I need to test, then shut them down. Eventually I delete the copies and recover the disk space.

Depending on where my laptop is running I’ll get a completely random IP address for the VM from the local DHCP server. I would log into the consoles, get the IPs, then log into the various VMs from a terminal. (Cut and paste just works a whole lot better on a terminal than on the VMware console.)

However, since the console screens are up, and I repeat this pattern several times a week, I figured why not save a step and make the ephemeral VMs just show me their IP address on their consoles without having to login, so I added an “on reboot” file called /etc/cron.d/welcome on the master image which updates the /etc/issue file.

/etc/cron.d/welcome looks like this:

@reboot root (/bin/hostname; /bin/uname -a; echo; if [ -x /sbin/ip ]; then /sbin/ip addr; else /sbin/ifconfig; fi) > /etc/issue

When a new VM boots, it writes the hostname, kernel info, and the ethernet config to the /etc/issue file. /etc/issue is displayed on the screen before the login prompt, so now I can just glance at the console, see the IP address, and ssh to the new VM.

Ephemeral VM

Although you’d never want to do this on a production system, it works great for ephemeral, throw-away test VMs.

Hope you find this useful.

Share Button

Increase a VM’s available memory with virsh

If you try to increase the amount of available memory using the obvious command it fails with an error message:

# virsh setmem <vm name> 16G --live
error: invalid argument: cannot set memory higher than max memory

The physical host in this case has 128G RAM and 32 CPUs. Plenty of capacity. To increase the maximum amount of memory that can be allocated to the VM:

# virsh setmaxmem <vm name> 16G --config

There are also –live and –current options which claim to affect the running/current domain. These options do not actually work. You have to use the –config option (changes take effect after next boot) and then power off the machine by logging in and running “poweroff”.

Once the machine is off set the actual memory with:

# virsh setmem <vm name> 16G --config

Then start the vm:

# virsh start <vm name>

Once the VM starts up it will have more memory.

Hope you find this useful.

Share Button

Increase a VM’s vcpu count with virsh

You have a virtual machine you created with virsh. You want to increase the number of vcpus in the virtual machine, so you use the obvious command:

virsh setvcpus --count 8 <vm name>

… and get the irritating error message:

error: invalid argument: requested vcpus is greater than max allowable vcpus for the domain: 8 > 2

This is virsh telling you that you can’t increase the number of vcpus to a number larger than what you started with.

Although virsh doesn’t support increasing the number of vcpus while the VM is running, you can change the number of vcpus if you’re willing to reboot the VM. All you need to to is to edit the virsh XML file with:

virsh edit <vm name>

Look for the line “vcpu placement” and increase the value to the number of vcpus that you want. I changed the vcpus from 2 to 8 here:

<vcpu placement='static'>8</vcpu>

Save the file.

Shutdown the VM:

virsh shutdown <vm name>

Wait until the VM’s status is “shut down”.

virsh list --all

Destroy the VM:

virsh destroy <vm name>

Start up the VM:

virsh start <vm name>

Once the VM starts you’ll have more vcpus running.

Hope you find this useful.

Share Button