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Creating AWS Elastic Filesystems (EFS) with Terraform

The AWS Elastic Filesystem (EFS) gives you an NFSv4-mountable file system with almost unlimited storage capacity. The filesystem I just created to write this article reports 9,007,199,254,739,968 bytes free. In human-readable format df -kh reports 8.0E (Exabytes) of available disk space. In the year 2019, that’s a lot of storage space.

In past articles I’ve shown how to create EFS resources manually, but this week I wanted to programmatically create EFS resources with Terraform so that I could easily create, test, and tear-down EFS and VM resources on AWS.

I also wanted to make sure that my EFS resources are secure, that only VMs within my Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) could access the EFS data, so that no one outside of my VPC could mount or otherwise access the data.

Creating an EFS resource is easy. The Terraform code looks like this:

// efs.tf
resource "aws_efs_file_system" "efs-example" {
creation_token = "efs-example"
performance_mode = "generalPurpose"
throughput_mode = "bursting"
encrypted = "true"
tags = {
Name = "EfsExample"
}
}

This creates the EFS filesystem on AWS. EFS also requires a mount target, which gives your VMs a way to mount the EFS volume using NFS. The Terraform code to create a mount target looks like this:

// efs.tf (continued)
resource "aws_efs_mount_target" "efs-mt-example" {
file_system_id = "${aws_efs_file_system.efs-example.id}"
subnet_id = "${aws_subnet.subnet-efs.id}"
security_groups = ["${aws_security_group.ingress-efs.id}"]
}

The file_system_id is automatically set to the efs-example resource’s ID, which ties the mount target to the EFS file system.

The subnet_id for subnet-efs is a separate /24 subnet I created from my VPC just for EFS. The ingress-efs security group is a separate security group I created for EFS. Let’s cover each one of these separately.

A separate EFS subnet

First off I’ve allocated a /16 subnet for my VPC and I carve out individual /24 subnets from that VPC for each cluster of VMs and/or EFS resources that I add to an AWS availability zone. Here’s how I’ve defined my test environment VPC and EFS subnet:

//network.tf
resource "aws_vpc" "test-env" {
cidr_block = "10.0.0.0/16"
enable_dns_hostnames = true
enable_dns_support = true
tags {
Name = "test-env"
}
}

resource "aws_subnet" "subnet-efs" {
cidr_block = "${cidrsubnet(aws_vpc.test-env.cidr_block, 8, 8)}"
vpc_id = "${aws_vpc.test-env.id}"
availability_zone = "us-east-1a"
}

That will give me the subnet 10.0.8.0/24 for my EFS subnet.

If you want to understand how to use Terraform’s cidrsubnet command to carve out separate subnets, see the article Terraform `cidrsubnet` Deconstructed by Lisa Hagemann. Her article gives excellent examples on how to do just that.

The EFS security group

Finally, I need a security group that only allows traffic between my test environment VMs and my test environment EFS volume. I already have a security group called ingress-test-env that is used to control security for my VMs. For EFS I create another security group that allows inbound traffic on port 2049 (the NFSv4 port), allows egress traffic on any port.

By setting the ingress-efs-test resource’s security_groups attribute to ingress-test-env this only allows network traffic to and from VMs in the ingress-test-env security group to talk to the EFS volume. If you use security_groups like this, you really lock down the EFS volume and you don’t need to set the cidr_blocks attribute at all.

// security.tf
resource "aws_security_group" "ingress-efs-test" {
name = "ingress-efs-test-sg"
vpc_id = "${aws_vpc.test-env.id}"

// NFS
ingress {
security_groups = ["${aws_security_group.ingress-test-env.id}"]
from_port = 2049
to_port = 2049
protocol = "tcp"
}

// Terraform removes the default rule
egress {
security_groups = ["${aws_security_group.ingress-test-env.id}"]
from_port = 0
to_port = 0
protocol = "-1"
}
}

After adding these Terraform files to my cluster configuration and running terraform apply, I end up with a new EFS filesystem that I can mount from any VM running in my VPC.

# mount -t nfs4 -o nfsvers=4.1,rsize=1048576,wsize=1048576,hard,timeo=600,retrans=2,noresvport fs-31337er3.efs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com:/ /mnt/efs
# df -kh
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev 481M 0 481M 0% /dev
tmpfs 99M 744K 98M 1% /run
/dev/xvda1 7.7G 3.0G 4.7G 40% /
tmpfs 492M 0 492M 0% /dev/shm
tmpfs 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock
tmpfs 492M 0 492M 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/loop0 13M 13M 0 100% /snap/amazon-ssm-agent/150
/dev/loop1 87M 87M 0 100% /snap/core/4650
/dev/loop2 90M 90M 0 100% /snap/core/6130
/dev/loop3 18M 18M 0 100% /snap/amazon-ssm-agent/930
tmpfs 99M 0 99M 0% /run/user/1000
fs-31337er3.efs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com:/ 8.0E 0 8.0E 0% /mnt/efs

Hope you found this useful.

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