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Mouse button Copy & Paste on Ubuntu 20.04

Using the left mouse button to select and copy text in terminals and the middle mouse button to paste has been a feature of X-Windows, and the various window managers built on top of X-Windows, since the early 1990s. With the release of Ubuntu 20.04 and Gnome 3.36 Canonical has removed this convention, forcing a more awkward and slower select, right click, select Copy from a menu, point, right click, select Paste from menu to do the same thing.

If you want to restore select-to-copy, middle button to paste functionality to Ubuntu 20.04 just follow these steps.

Restore select-to-copy functionality

Edit the file .Xresources in your home directory.

Add the line:

xterm*selectToClipboard: true

… to the file, then logout of your desktop and log back in, or reboot.

Once you’ve done that any text that you select in the Terminal program with your left mouse button will be copied to your clipboard. Left click a word and the word is copied to the clipboard. Left click and drag to select and copy an entire line, an entire paragraph, or more.

Restore middle-button paste functionality

Install gnome-tweaks:

sudo apt-get install gnome-tweaks

Click “Activities” in the upper right and search for “tweaks”, click the “Tweaks” icon.

Select “Keyboard & Mouse” and turn “Middle Click Paste” to “on”.

Once you’ve done that, clicking the middle mouse button will paste text from your clipboard back into the terminal.

Hope you find this useful.

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Install a local .deb file and its dependencies

To install a local deb file and its dependencies use apt, not dpkg:

sudo apt install ./foo-1.2.3.deb

You’ll automatically get all of the dependencies installed with the package. (dpkg doesn’t understand dependencies or repos, apt does.)

The leading ./, or a full or relative path to the deb file, is required. The path is what tells apt that it’s a local file.

Hope you find this useful.

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How to get the IP address of a KVM/virsh VM

Since virsh domifaddr doesn’t work to get the IP addresses of VMs on a bridged network, I wrote a get-vm-ip script (which you can download from Github) which uses this to get the IP of a running VM:

HOSTNAME=[your vm name]
MAC=$(virsh domiflist $HOSTNAME | awk '{ print $5 }' | tail -2 | head -1)
arp -a | grep $MAC | awk '{ print $2 }' | sed 's/[()]//g'

The virsh command gets the MAC address, the last line finds the IP address using arp.

Hope you find this useful.

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Redirect mail links to GMail on Ubuntu 18.04 using Desktop Webmail

My Ubuntu 18.04 box has Thunderbird installed as the default mail client. I was a Thunderbird user for years, but I currently spend most of my time using GMail, and when I click on a email mailto: link on a web page Ubuntu will load Thunderbird.

The documented fix is to go to Settings > Details > Default Applications and pick a different mail client. However, I don’t want a mail client at all, I want mail links to go to my default browser (Firefox, on this machine), load GMail, and open a to email “to” the name in the link.

The documented fix for that issue is to install the gnome-gmail package, but I don’t always use Gnome, so I installed Desktop Webmail instead.

If you want to try it, these are the steps:

  • Fire up Synaptic Package Manager
  • Install the desktop-webmail package
  • Go to Settings > Details > Default Applications and pick Desktop Webmail as your default mail client.

The next time you click a mailto: link Desktop Webmail will ask you what web mail service you want to use. Desktop Webmail currently supports Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo and Zoho. Select Gmail and it’ll pop up a new email message using GMail, set the “to” address to the mailto: link, using your preferred browser.

Hope you found this useful.

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Removing mount volumes from your desktop in Ubuntu 17.10

I just upgraded from Ubuntu 17.04 to 17.10 and one of the first things I noticed was all of the disk volumes that are mounted under my home directory appeared on my desktop. In Ubuntu 17.10, all volumes that are mounted under /home or /media appear on your desktop, and none of the switches in the Settings tool will make them go away.

The names of the folders aren’t even useful. They’re names like 10GB Volume and 20GB Volume. If you have two volumes the same size they’ll both have the same useless name. No hint of where the volume is mounted appears.

I have files, documents, databases, and email going back 20 years, much of it archival data that I want to be able to search but which never gets updated, so I keep these archive directories on separate read-only logical volumes. If my home directory’s file system gets corrupted beyond repair, the archives will still be intact. Since the volumes are read-only a misbehaving program or command-line oops won’t destroy the data.

But I don’t want to see them all over my desktop.

Tweak tool to the rescue! Install the tool and run it:

sudo apt install gnome-tweak-tool
gnome-tweak-tool

Then:

Desktop > Mounted Volumes > Off

No more volume icons on the desktop!

gnome-tweak-tool has other useful settings that are absent from the Settings tool, such as giving you the ability to move the window buttons to the upper left side of your windows.

Want to make the icons on your desktop smaller? Open up the File Manager, browse to Desktop, and select the icon size you want by moving the slider bar. The size of the icons on your Desktop and the size in the File Manager’s Desktop folder both use the same setting.

Hope you find this useful.

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